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Organization Contact Information

Name: Ayries Multipurpose Social Service Society
Street 1: Veerareddikuppam, Palayappattinam P.O
Street 2: Vriddhachalam, T.K
City: veerareddi kuppam
Province: Tamilnadu
Post Code: 606001
Country: India
Phone: 00 91 4143 240420
Email: ppillei@yahoo.co.uk
Web Site: http://.www.ayries.org

Focal Point Contact Information

Salutation: Mr
First Name: Chinnappan pitchai pillai
Last Name: Pitchaipillai
Title: Managing Director
Email: ppillei@yahoo.co.uk
Phone: 00-91-9442440320

Alternate Focal Point Contact Information

Salutation: Mrs
First Name: A.G.S.JULIANA
Last Name: JULIANA
Title: SERETARY
Email: ayriesindia@gmail.com
Phone: 00-91-04143-240420

General Information

Board Constituency: Developing Country NGO
Organization Type - Primary: Non-Governmental Organization
Organization Type - Secondary: Other Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)
Is your organization legally registered in your country: Yes
Organization Reach: National
Organization Description:
Ayries is a non profit, non government organization registered under state and central government act, our service is aimed at assisting people's health.

Our TB work at present is:
provide nutrition for people with disability,
1. Providing DOTS
2. Sputum Examination under RNTCP
3. Counseling to HIV-TB patients
4. Providing medical treatment to PI-VD-STD patients
5. Children nutrition and education Ayries Society
Annual Report and Review 31.10.2008 to 30.10.2009
and Newsletter July 2010

The Ayries Society

The Ayries Society is established for the relief of sickness and poverty and for the preservation of health amongst children and adults primarily in the Virudhachalam area of Tamil Nadu, South India. It works closely with the Ayries Society, a registered NGO based in the village of Veerareddikuppam.

The Ayries Trust is constituted by the Deed of Trust dated 5th December 2007. The trustees of the charity are Julia Clark Blowes, Diana Fearnside, Amanda Killip and Alistair Norman.
All the assets of the charity are represented by the bank accounts holding undistributed funds. The charity has no paid staff and no remuneration is paid directly or indirectly to the trustees or any other person in the UK. No administration fees are paid to the trustees and all visitors to the Ayries Society in India pay their own expenses. Some printing costs and bank transfer fees are paid direct from the bank account.
2
Staff
Currently 12 staff are employed including HIV/AIDS counsellors, physiotherapy staff, TB technicians and a cook. It has to be said that many of the employees are adept at working in several areas: some who spend most of the time working with the children with disabilities, for example, are also qualified to diagnose TB.
We aim to pay our staff a fair wage but inflation in India has been running at 14% generally, and at 20% for food. With this situation and a request from staff, it was decided this year to provide the opportunity for Ayries employees to join a pension scheme. The
 
Total number of staff in your organization: 11 - 25
Number of full-time staff who are directly involved with TB: 11 - 25
Number of part-time staff who are directly involved with TB: 1 - 5
Number of volunteers who are directly involved with TB: 1 - 5
 
What is your organization's annual budget (USD) dedicated to TB? $5,001-$10,000
How did you hear about the Stop TB Partnership: Involvement in TB control provision
If you were informed or referred by another partner of the Stop TB Partnership please tell us who:
Why do you wish join the Stop TB Partnership: Information on developments within the TB world
 
Are you a member of a Stop TB national partnership: India
Are you in contact with your national TB programme: Yes
Please tell us how your organization is contributing to your country's national TB control plan:
Tuberculosis (TB)
The Ayries Society has a proven track record in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Over the past 6 years, 417 patients have successfully completed the six-month treatment programme.

Background

It is estimated that 30% of the world’s population have the latent form of the TB infection. One in ten then go on to develop the active infection which if untreated kills about 50% of its victims. Because under-nutrition greatly increases the risk of contracting tuberculosis, TB is often called a ‘disease of the poor’. Many patients reached by the Society have been undiagnosed for years or even decades. Until recently TB killed 1000 people a day in India.

How is TB diagnosed and treated?

Staff collect sputum smears at TB camps in villages from people who have symptoms. These are analysed by microscopy and if positive the patient is registered with Ayries and the Tamil Nadu Health Authority (so that the free drugs can be obtained) and begins treatment. TB is treated by DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course), which is the name given to the WHO-recommended TB control strategy. DOTS does not just mean the drug regime patients undergo but also the taking of drugs under the direct supervision of healthcare workers, the accurate record keeping of all aspects of the programme and follow-up after a favourable result is achieved. In order to avoid resistance to the antibiotics patients must take their drugs (typically 4 antibiotics simultaneously) regularly during the six-month period. This is why support from Ayries staff, which includes group meetings at the centre, is so important.

Nutrition

It has been well documented that nutritional provision increases the chance of a positive outcome for patients on the DOTS programme: once treatment starts, patients usually experience increased or renewed appetite, and since many patients cannot afford extra food, they can often stop taking drugs. This leads to a raised chance of future drug resistance. Because TB greatly reduces the capacity to work, provision of nutrition for the whole family is most valuable and increases the incentive for patients to remain on the DOTS programme. In turn this reduces the risk of children in the family contracting TB because their nutritional intake improves while the adults are being treated.

The Ayries TB Programme

For the last 5 years, an average of 23 patients have been treated at any one time (between 17 and 28). However, the Trust has been able to purchase scooters for use by the TB specialists on the staff, meaning they can now access a larger area and reach more people. This means staff now work with an average of 33 patients. The Indian Government’s target for DOTS success is 85%. Ayries have a success rate of around 98 to 99%.
 

Geographical Reach

Which country is your headquarters located in: India
Which WHO region is the main focus of your work: South East Asian
Which countries do you do operate in:
(This includes countries you are conducting activities in)
India

Specializations

Advocacy
Delivery of health services and care
Funding, including innovative and optimized approach to funding TB Care
Provision of drugs, diagnostics and commodities
Research and Development
Technical Assistance

Specializations in Countries

Advocacy India

Contribution

Please tell us how your organization will contribute to the Global Plan to Stop TB by briefly describing its involvement in any of the areas of work listed below:

TB Care Delivery:
Tuberculosis (TB)
The Ayries Society has a proven track record in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Over the past 6 years, 417 patients have successfully completed the six-month treatment programme.

Background

It is estimated that 30% of the world’s population have the latent form of the TB infection. One in ten then go on to develop the active infection which if untreated kills about 50% of its victims. Because under-nutrition greatly increases the risk of contracting tuberculosis, TB is often called a ‘disease of the poor’. Many patients reached by the Society have been undiagnosed for years or even decades. Until recently TB killed 1000 people a day in India.

How is TB diagnosed and treated?

Staff collect sputum smears at TB camps in villages from people who have symptoms. These are analysed by microscopy and if positive the patient is registered with Ayries and the Tamil Nadu Health Authority (so that the free drugs can be obtained) and begins treatment. TB is treated by DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course), which is the name given to the WHO-recommended TB control strategy. DOTS does not just mean the drug regime patients undergo but also the taking of drugs under the direct supervision of healthcare workers, the accurate record keeping of all aspects of the programme and follow-up after a favourable result is achieved. In order to avoid resistance to the antibiotics patients must take their drugs (typically 4 antibiotics simultaneously) regularly during the six-month period. This is why support from Ayries staff, which includes group meetings at the centre, is so important.

Nutrition

It has been well documented that nutritional provision increases the chance of a positive outcome for patients on the DOTS programme: once treatment starts, patients usually experience increased or renewed appetite, and since many patients cannot afford extra food, they can often stop taking drugs. This leads to a raised chance of future drug resistance. Because TB greatly reduces the capacity to work, provision of nutrition for the whole family is most valuable and increases the incentive for patients to remain on the DOTS programme. In turn this reduces the risk of children in the family contracting TB because their nutritional intake improves while the adults are being treated.

The Ayries TB Programme

For the last 5 years, an average of 23 patients have been treated at any one time (between 17 and 28). However, the Trust has been able to purchase scooters for use by the TB specialists on the staff, meaning they can now access a larger area and reach more people. This means staff now work with an average of 33 patients. The Indian Government’s target for DOTS success is 85%. Ayries have a success rate of around 98 to 99%.


TB-HIV:
People Living with HIV / AIDS (PLHA)
Background

The aims of the Ayries PLHA programme are to provide educational support, nutrition and counselling for people living in families affected by HIV/AIDS, working in partnership with other organisations such as the State Government and Positive Peoples. There are approximately 50 PLHA families in the area where Ayries works.

Access to help and treatment

Ayries has two trained PLHA staff, both positive themselves who, travelling around the villages by bus, act as advocates and counsellors to positive peoples and patients and to their families. Strictest confidence is maintained as the stigma associated with HIV and AIDS is often considerable.

Since 2005, antiretroviral treatment has been available from some Government centres and the national target for 2010 is for 38% of affected people to be accessing treatment. The closest treatment centre is Tambaram, about 5 hours away by bus. A condition of treatment is that after a 16-day stay in the centre while the ART regime is begun, the patient must be released to the care of a trained ‘guardian’ who helps counsel the patient through the side effects and ensures the drugs regime is strictly adhered to so that drug resistance is avoided. Our staff act as these guardians.

The PLHA nutrition programme

Ayries staff also deliver the nutrition funded by Meal-a-Day Australia. Providing nutrition for families has multiple functions including:

enabling someone to cope with the start of antiretroviral treatment where loss of appetite and difficulty in eating can mean his/her health deteriorates further
taking pressure off these poor families (where parents have often been out of work for months or years) so that children can continue in school. This is particularly important for girls so that they can gain the independence to challenge the discrimination that makes them vulnerable to HIV and abuse
making feasible the fostering of orphaned children by grandparents or aunts/uncles.
The nutrition programme is part of an integrated approach to easing the burden of HIV and AIDS for patients and their families, helping people with HIV provide for their families again, and encouraging the schooling of children, therefore helping break the chain of infection within these communities.

Group meetings and education

In the wider programme, 26 of the PLHA children are helped with their education by an Indian software company. Donors to the Ayries Trust are helping fully with school and College fees for 6 older children, including one who is boarding at school to avoid a difficult family situation. The Trust has a minimum three-year commitment to this assistance.

Members of PLHA families are invited to group meetings at the centre every two weeks where they also share a communal meal. Positive people are particularly vulnerable to TB infection and at any one time several of our DOTS patients may be from PLHA families.


Declaration

Declaration of interests:
Information is given by me and is correct best of my knowledge

Application date:  
Last updated: June 16, 2014